MET gene disruption causes syndrome of gut disorders and autistic symptoms

This is exerpt from an article.  Can a disrupted MET gene be repaired?  This is IMPORTANT as if we can repair genes maybe whe can reduce or cure autism in some people.

“The findings suggest that disrupted signaling of the MET gene may contribute to a syndrome that includes autism and co-occurring gastrointestinal dysfunction, says principal investigator Pat Levitt, Ph.D., director of the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and chair-designate of the Department of cell and neurobiology.

The study will appear in the March Issue of the Journal of Pediatrics and is now available online.

Autism is a developmental disorder characterized by deficits in communication abilities, social behavior disruption and inflexible behavior. While gastrointestinal conditions are common among individuals with autism, researchers have long debated whether co-occurring GI dysfunction represents a unique autism subgroup, Levitt and lead author Daniel Campbell, Ph.D., say.

³Gastrointestinal disorders don¹t cause autism. Autism is a disorder of brain development,² Levitt says. ³However, our study is the first to bring together genetic risk for autism and co-occurring GI disorders in a way that provides a biologically plausible explanation for why they are seen together so often.²

In the brain, the MET gene is expressed in developing circuits that are involved in social behavior and communication. Disturbances in MET expression result in alterations in how these critical circuits develop and mature, Levitt explains. Research indicates that MET also plays an important role in development and repair of the GI system.

Researchers analyzed medical history records from 214 families in the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE). They found that a variant in the MET gene was associated with autism specifically in those families where an individual had co-occurring autism and a GI condition.

The study brings researchers closer to understanding the complex genetic risks for autism. However, further research is needed, as different combinations of genes are likely to result in different types of autism features, Levitt says.

³We believe that there are other genes that will help identify different subgroups of individuals who have autism spectrum disorder,² he says. ³We also believe that there needs to be research looking at whether the children with co-occurring GI dysfunction and autism have unique features that will help us predict what treatments will be best for them.²

The study was funded by the Simons Foundation, the Nancy Lurie Marks Foundation, the Dan Marino Foundation¹s Marino Autism Research Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.” 

“Distinct Genetic Risk Based on Association of MET in Families With Co- occurring Autism and Gastrointestinal Conditions.”
Daniel B. Campbell, Timothy M. Buie, Harland Winter, Margaret Bauman, James S. Sutcliffe, James M. Perrin, Pat Levitt.
Pediatrics. Doi: 10.1542/peds.2008-0819.

University of Southern California
Vanderbilt University

pressureized oxygen treatment reduces symptoms of autism

The following is taken from a recent article on success treating autism with presurized oxygen: 

In a medical world that tells parents of autistic children to “accept” the condition of their child, a new study brings not only hope, but actual help, to these families. Lead physician and researcher, Daniel Rossignol, M.D., treats children with autism. Seeing his patients improve with hyperbaric oxygen treatment led him to conduct the first large scale, double-blind, controlled study to examine its effectiveness. And, the results of this study demonstrate positive improvements.

Hyperbaric therapy traditionally involves inhaling up to 100% oxygen at a pressure greater than 1 atmosphere (atm) in a pressurized chamber. In the first randomized, controlled, double-blind multicenter trial, published in BMC Pediatrics and entitled “Hyperbaric treatment for children with autism: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.” Dr. Rossignol and colleagues, from 6 centers in the USA, studied 62 children, aged 2-7 years, to assess the efficacy of hyperbaric treatment in children with autism.

The research trial concludes that children with autism who received hyperbaric treatment at 1.3 atmospheres and 24% oxygen for 40 hourly sessions had significant improvements in overall functioning, receptive language, social interaction, eye contact, and sensory/cognitive awareness compared to children who received slightly pressurized room air.

The children were randomly assigned to either 40 hours of hyperbaric treatment at 1.3 atm and 24% oxygen (treatment group) or slightly pressurized room air at 1.03 atm and 21% oxygen (non-treatment group). Clinical outcomes were evaluated by three different scales: the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale, the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), and the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC).

Dr. Rossignol said, “In our study, we observed significant improvements in several core autistic behaviors with the use of hyperbaric therapy at 1.3 atm compared to children receiving near-placebo treatment. These findings confirm what we are seeing in clinical practice–that many children with autism may benefit with the use of this treatment.”

Director of the International Hyperbarics Association, Shannon Kenitz, said, “With autism on the rise, it is promising to see a study that has been conducted with the high standards endorsed by the medical community. Having this scientifically controlled and analyzed study that shows the positive effects of hyperbarics is truly what this community has needed. The study not only presents the benefit of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for children with autism, but also gives families the hope that so many other therapies have failed to do.”

“The impact of this study on the autism community is significant. It brings validity to a successful intervention that needs to become part of mainstream medicine,” commented Kyle Van Dyke, M.D., and Autism Specialist from Madison, Wisconsin.

According to Philip James, M.D., an expert in hyperbaric medicine out of the UK, this study is “An article of outstanding merit and interest in its field.”

The growing concern regarding autism in this country is reinforced by the critically high ranking this study as earned by BMC Pediatrics. It is currently the most accessed article and projected to continue to climb in significance.

International Hyperbarics Association, Inc.
http://www.ihausa.org

Oiled Seal soon to be released.

Olive, a seal rescured from Monterey Bay recently, will be released back into Monterey Bay soon.  She was covered with black oil naturally gushing up during the recent storms.  To clean her up, she was washed with olive oil.  Hence her name.  Several agencies including the Monterey Bay Acquarium and U.C. Santa Cruz assisted in her rescue.

Move a polling place from garage to school

This case is now before the U.S. Supreme Courtt. How decided may affect how law in enforced in   Monterey County. 

In Austin, Texas, they wanted to move a polling place from a garage to an elementary school.  Seems simple.  They were told that they  first had to get permission from the  U.S. Justice Department Why? Because  Section 5 of the Voting Right Act is imposed on Texas. Section 5 is also imposed on  Monterey County. Justice Kennedy is considered to be the swing vote on the case.  Kennedy tends to be skeptical of race conscious laws. 

 

 

 

. This case will soon come up before the  U.S. Supreme Court.

Support Local Live Theater

James Jackson appears in his seventh  play  in three years  for Golden Crow Productions.  The play is Rat Race.  Jackson plays Donald Sinclair, a flamboyant personality wearing  a flamboyant, purple suit. 

 Rat Race starts April 17.  Location:  Bethany University in Scotts Valley, CA  For more information go to: www.goldencrow.org   You can contact James Jackson at:  jaj48@aol.com

Save your ticket stubs! Email to CameronJacks@gmail.com or call 831 688-6002 that you attended. We will send half the cost of your ticket to the church/worship place of your choice located in Santa Cruz County. Support the arts. And support churches and places of worship.