Firenze Sage: Today’s special — clam chowder with methane…. did you know clams contribute to global warming?

    Baltic clams and worms release as much greenhouse gas as 20,000 dairy cows

New study shows that oceans with worms and clams enhance the release of methane into the atmosphere up to eight times more than oceans without them

Scientists have shown that ocean clams and worms are releasing a significant amount of potentially harmful greenhouse gas into the atmosphere.

The team, from Cardiff University and Stockholm University, have shown that the ocean critters are producing large amounts of the strongest greenhouse gases – methane and nitrous oxides – from the bacteria in their guts.

Methane gas is making its way into the water and then finally out into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming – methane has 28 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide.

A detailed analysis showed that around 10 per cent of total methane emissions from the Baltic Sea may be due to clams and worms.

The researchers estimate that this is equivalent to as much methane given off as 20,000 dairy cows. This is as much as 10 per cent of the entire Welsh dairy cow population and 1 per cent of the entire UK dairy cow population.

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Firenze Sage writes:   Governor Brown, moonbeam California , proposed methane bags for cows. Will he propose teeny weeny clam bags?

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Firenze Sage: What big teeth you have, grandson …. [unaccompanied ‘children’ to Sweeden

Ah, what big teeth you  have, grandson ….     When   Swedish dental hygienist Herlitz told authorities that supposed  ‘ unaccompanied  migrant children’   were actually adults — based on the development of  their wisdom  teeth  —    he got  fired.

Egor Putilov, a former Rikstag member and political asylum officer for the government’s Migration Board, reports for Samhällsnytt on Oct. 4, 2017 that a dental hygienist made the mistake of informing the Migration Board that the majority of “unaccompanied” child “migrants” in Sweden actually are adults. For that, he was fired from his job and his home is threatened with confiscation.

Bernt Herlitz, now 57, and his wife were trained to become dental hygienists in a three-year course of studies at Umeå University, after which both found employment at the Public Health Service in Visby, Sweden, where many so-called unaccompanied refugees seek dental care.

In July 2016, the couple attended a seminar in Almedalen on how an individual’s age can be assessed by his/her teeth. One of the seminar attendees was Åsa Carlander-Hemingway, a unit manager from the Swedish Migration Board, who told the couple that it is important that all suspicions about the age of “unaccompanied” refugees be reported to the Board.

Herlitz determined that most of the “unaccompanied” child refugees are actually adults. As he put it:

“I would probably appreciate that up to 80% of them were obviously adults. This can be seen, for example, from their wisdom teeth that are fully grown–something that is only seen in adults. Two weeks laterHerlitz was summarily fired after 10 years of service at Folktandvården. The reason given was that he had violated patient confidentiality.

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Firenze Sage writes:   So when the wailing for children subsided it turned out that big teeth exposed the fraud. Travel ban anyone?

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Firenze Sage: Guess WHO and WHERE? [asylum seekers in Denmark]

   Who  really comes from where seeking asylum in Denmark?

Danish authorities have found that 90 percent   (634 out of 700) asylum seekers under investigation for lying about their identity were claiming to be persecuted minorities in Kuwait but almost all were really from Iraq.

Over the course of several months, Danish authorities investigated the identities of 700 asylum seekers who claimed to be fleeing persecution in Kuwait. The vast majority of them, according to authorities, were from elsewhere and have been given a rejection to their asylum applications and will be deported Jyllands-Posten reports.

Anders Dorph, Deputy Director of the Immigration Service, responsible for asylum called the investigation very important and said, “We have previously seen cases of fraud where they try to lie about having another nationality to gain an advantage, but not to this extent.”

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Firenze Sage writes:  And the left whines when we want to check who wants in here.

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Typical Obama — a $1.5 BILLION dollar library without books

Typical Obama —  a  $1.5 BILLION library without books.

The Obama  library provides document access from any computer anywhere.  World wide.

Which means that the Obama library ‘picks up’ the internet address of all persons world wide accessing it. Quite a coup for connecting forever with persons supporting Obama’s policies.

There’s a time when excesses build to reach Nero and Caligula levels, and as presidential libraries go, the Obama Library on the South Side of Chicago seems to have hit that tipping point.

The Obama Library is on track to cost $1.5 billion, three times the $500 million it was projected to cost, and quite a bit of that will be borne by taxpayers.  Yet it won’t contain…any library materials.  It won’t even be hooked up to the National Archives system – on account of it being too cheap to want to pay the six-figure costs of that purpose.

All it will have is online document access, which can be reached from any computer anywhere.  There will be nothing special about coming to the Obama library to do any kind of presidential research.  What’s more, it’s a great way to cherry-pick which documents can be seen among the Obama papers and which cannot.  Is this library really about what libraries are about, which is to say scholarship of the historical record?  Not in Obama’s case.  He’d probably rather no one remember the details of his many failures in office, which those records could show.

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Firenze Sage writes:  Will Michelle get space for her rutabaga garden?

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Do American kids want to wait on tables at seasonal resorts? 300,000 foreigners do!

In 2016, 300,000 foreigners  received J-I visas to work or study in the USA.

In the WSJ Oct. 5,  Herb Segal, USA (retired) raised the question, “Are these foreigners replacing native workers at lower pay?”

These 300,000 foreigners can  wait on tables, manage reception desks and perform housekeeping and  custodial tasks at seasonal resorts.

“Are there no native kids looking for work experience to fill those programs?” asks Herb Segal.

Underlying this issue is what Congress will do — if anything —  concerning  comprehensive immigration reform.

Today, Senator Corker  publicly stated that all or most  Republicans oppose the Trump agenda.  What say you,  is this  ‘insiders’ opposed to ‘outsider Trump’?

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written  by Cameron Jackson

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Undocumented? Illegal? Go to East Palo Alto for full support services from the school district

Where to go if you are undocumented,  ‘homeless’ or need to ‘double up’ to keep housing costs down?

Go to East Palo Alto — just three miles from Stanford University.   The East Palo Alto  school district provides it all for ‘homeless’ students and their families: 3 meals a day, groceries, showers and overnight parking in a church lot.

East Palo Alto even  provides  an Uber or taxi if you need a ride to school.  

Families doubling up to keep housing costs down has long been a way of life in California.  Now, with the possibility of ICE enforcement more ‘homeless’ youth and their families  are ‘doubling up’ these days in the Bay Area.

East Palo Alto has the largest number of ‘homeless’ youth who are English language learners.

the above is written by Cameron Jackson.   Below is the complete story available in the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

The Santa Cruz Sentinel printed only part of its story in the print edition today, October 9, 2017.  Below is the complete story available online.

 

“The San Francisco Bay Area, with its Teslas, tech start-ups and $3,700 one-bedroom rents, is one of the most affluent regions in the country but also home to nearly 15,000 homeless children.

“Most of the students are in the urban areas, but they also live in the wealthy enclaves. They’re in Menlo Park, they’re in the San Ramon Valley, they’re even in Ross in Marin County, where the median household income tops $200,000. And they’re most certainly undercounted: parents report to schools whether their family is homeless, and they have plenty of reasons not to admit to it: fear of deportation, fear of the government taking their children away, and shame.

“According to the Department of Education, “homeless” means living in a car, motel, campsite, shelter, on the street or doubled up with other families due to financial hardship. In the Bay Area, most of those children are doubled up with other families, although in San Francisco hundreds are living on the street or in shelters.

The Bay Area has 420 school districts, charter schools and county offices of education in its nine counties, spread over 6,900 square miles from Cloverdale to Gilroy. But almost none have a higher percentage of homeless children than the Ravenswood City Elementary School District in East Palo Alto.

The Ravenswood district is less than 3 miles from Stanford University, yet has one of the highest percentages of homeless students in the state. More than 37 percent of the district’s 3,076 students are homeless, and of those, 96 percent live “doubled up” with other families, sharing a home or apartment or even a garage.

Nearly 88 percent of Ravenswood students qualify for free and reduced-price lunch, and 64 percent are English learners.

The district receives some federal grant money to help these children, but “that’s just a drop in the bucket. A Band-aid,” said Superintendent Gloria Hernandez-Goff. “Paying for these services ends up being a huge encroachment into the general fund. But we do it because kids can’t learn if they’re hungry, if they’re tired, if they’re distracted or worried. Our schools need to be a safe place where families know their children are cared for.”

The district also gets extra funding under the state’s Local Control Funding Formula, which steers money to schools to serve high-needs students, including those who are homeless, low-income, English learners or in foster care.

East Palo Alto provides the following services:   Ravenswood provides three meals a day, plus snacks, to all students regardless of whether they’re homeless and arranges for a food bank to give regular, two-week supplies of groceries to parents. The district also provides free uniforms for students, washers and dryers on school campuses, full-time counselors at every school, and arranges for families to get free showers at the local YMCA. A nearby Catholic church allows families to sleep overnight in the parking lot.

Transportation costs:   Perhaps the biggest expense, Hernandez-Goff said, is transportation. Children who bounce between homeless shelters are legally entitled to free transportation to school, so the district will send buses, taxis or even Uber to deliver the children to school every day. Homeless families tend to move frequently, and sometimes find themselves at shelters 20 miles away. By law, homeless children can continue attending the same school without having to transfer to a new school every time their family moves.

“It’s expensive, but we patch things together,” she said. “The bottom line is, the thing that has always unified this country is public education. Schools have always stepped up to address the needs of students. It’s not just about books — it’s so much more.”

In Ravenswood, most of the homeless families are Latin American immigrants living with other immigrant families. But in San Francisco, state data show, roughly half of the city’s 1,984 homeless students live on their own: teenage runaways escaping abusive homes or violence elsewhere.

No one knows exactly where these students live in San Francisco, but 300 a night sleep at the Larkin Street Youth Services shelter. Hundreds of others sleep in parks or under freeways, on friends’ couches, or trade sex for a place to sleep, according to Larkin Street’s executive director, Sherilyn Adams.

Amazingly, some find a way to get to school every day.

“A lot of these kids are not visibly homeless, and they often don’t want you to know they’re homeless,” Adams said. “Adolescence is a time of blending in, not standing out. So these kids face a lot of shame, a lot of isolation. Trying to do school work while figuring out where they’re going to sleep every night — they have a lot on their plate.”

In addition to the shelter, Larkin Street provides medical and behavioral services, street outreach and a drop-in center. Another nonprofit, Hamilton Families, contracts with San Francisco Unified to provide after-school tutoring and activities, field trips, bus passes, uniforms and other services to more than 800 children annually in the city.

In the East Bay, Oakland Unified saw its number of homeless students shoot up from 400 in 2014-15 to 635 in 2015-16 to 901 in 2016-17, largely due to the escalating cost of housing, the district’s homeless coordinator, Trish Anderson, said.

“Those numbers are real,” she said. “Rents are too high, and people are losing their homes.”

Oakland Unified provides a one-stop shop of services for its homeless families, including food, referrals to shelters and help enrolling in Medi-Cal. The district also provides immediate enrollment to homeless students, allowing them to waive much of the paperwork, and bus service to school. Like San Francisco, Oakland has a significant number of homeless youth who aren’t living with their families. Some find emergency shelter at DreamCatcher, an eight-bed shelter that provides a range of services for students as long as they remain in school.

Just north of San Francisco, San Rafael City Schools in Marin County goes to great lengths to identify homeless children and train teachers to accommodate them. In 2016-17, the district reported 625 homeless children at its eight elementary schools, one of the highest rates in the state.

As is the case throughout California, lack of affordable housing is the primary cause for the high homeless rate in the area. Immigrant parents working in the restaurant, housekeeping or landscaping sectors cannot afford to rent an apartment, so they share space with other families. Median monthly rent for a two-bedroom apartment in San Rafael is $3,080, almost three times the national average.

“We definitely have affordable housing issues. Unfortunately, that’s not something officials are moving very quickly on,” said Julia Neff, accountability coordinator for San Rafael City Schools. “But it’s the school district’s responsibility to meet these students where they are. We do what we can.”

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   The Sentinel frames their  story as one about ‘homelessness’.  It’s really a story about undocumented youth and their families.  And it’s really   a story about how CA is addressing the sanctuary city issues.  And it’s a story about borders and whether  America should  have borders. Remember that young woman killed by an illegal who had been deported 5 times from the USA.  That’s when there was a huge surge in support for control of our borders.

written by Cameron Jackson 10/9/2017     DrCameronJackson@gmail.com

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Hepatitis outbreak in CA — where do homeless people poop in Aptos & Santa Cruz CA?

Where do homeless people poop in Aptos & Santa Cruz County?  This is a major health hazard beter  managed with  easy access to  portable toilets.

But few portable toilets  exist in Aptos and nearby  Santa Cruz, CA.

Most of the time, the bathroom  doors are  locked at most Aptos churches and in  most public facilities.

Since plastic bags are now outlawed, homeless cannot readily clean up after themselves.  There are a few portable toilets  — but not many.

The California hepatitis A outbreak is on the verge of reaching statewide epidemic status, as cases have spread through homeless tent cities from San Diego north to Sacramento.

California health officials have reported that at least 569 people have been infected with the hepatitis A liver disease and 17 have died since a San Diego County outbreak was first identified in November. Cases have migrated north to homeless populations in Los Angeles, Santa Cruz, San Francisco and Sacramento over the last 11 months.

Although local and state authorities have tried to underplay the risks and severity of the outbreak, the most recent annual totals for cases of hepatitis A in the United States was 1,390 in 2015, according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC). California only reported 179 cases during the same year.

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Aptos Psychologist Dr. Jackson writes:     Are portable toilets just one more thing that  taxpayers  have to pay for?  Looks like yes.   Human poop is a  major health hazard in CA.

How might  churches and other community organizations help control disease problems related to human poop?  Let’s get the issues on agendas of various Aptos and Santa Cruz community organizations.Will that really happen?  Mmmmm.

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written by Cameron Jackson   DrCameronJackson@gmail.colm

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freedom ? — Trump, Hilary and the “swamp” in Washington square off…. who is winning?

Three issues:  immigration, taxes and health care.  Looks like  the “swamp” still runs Washingon D.C. The alligators are strong.

And the world keeps getting less safe in so many ways…. Las Vegas with 50+ dead and 500 sent to hospital. So sad.  So terrible.

Trump stumped for a physical   Wall to control illegal immigration,  he wants to  reduce taxes on the middle class  and Trump  wants to repeal Obama-Care.

Where are we?

So far, 10 months into his Presidency,  Trump   can’t seem  get much done on any of these three issues.  The ‘swamp’ [big time donors, the ‘establishment’ of both Democrats and Republicans] oppose Trump’s stance on all  3 issues.

Remember Hillary?  Hilary opposed a Wall, wanted  a single payer system of health care and said  she wants to soak the rich —  but who knows really what her policies would have been on taxes.

Freedom for the little guy.  The small business.  The lemon juice  stand.  People who want to start a business or grow one.  How can we help to  increase freedom?

And how can people safely go to a Country Western concert and just ‘hang out’ with friends listening to music that heals them?  How do we as a People heal …?

written  Oct. 7, 2017  by Cameron Jackson    DrCameronJackson@gmail.com

 

 

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MSNBC host: Every good Republican has a tank … part of the right to bear arms

 Every good Republican has a tank…. part of the right to bear arms …so says MSNBC Chris Matthews.  

Thursday on MSNBC’s “Hardball,” host Chris Matthews said Republicans were “fanatics” on guns and that they even supported private ownership of tanks.

Chris Matthews  added, “Well you know what the Republican’s says in their platform that the right to bear arms precedes the Constitution. It’s a God-given sort of theological right. They treat this like religion. I don’t know how to explain it. It’s a religious, essential notion to them that everybody should have any kind of gun they want, any—a bazooka, a tank. They never put a limit on it, ever.”

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Firenze Sage responds:   Yes, Chris,  it is an unalienable right to defend oneself against the govt so as to protect your right to say stupid things.

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Comcast, government, bureaucracy: Just keep ’em moving … what to do about The Big Shuffle?

Just keep ’em moving.  That’s what happens when you deal with  government and  bureaucracy.   Just try to start something new in a moribund organization — it won’t get off the ground.

Yesterday   — in Aptos, CA —  in a Parkinson’s support group a man  with severe Parkinson’s issues said to a government bureaucrat:

Can you help?  Whenever I contact Comcast I get the big shuffle …  Comcast used to come out and help when my service got messed up and now they do nothing …

And what did that government bureaucrat do?  Nothing.  He referred the man elsewhere.  Ah, yes, just keep ’em moving. That’s the  Big Shuffle.

What to do about COMCAST?   It used to be that they helped people who had problems. Now it’s just  ‘move ’em on….’

It’s not just COMCAST — it’s lots of organizations including churches.

You want to put a bench outside a church building?   You get referred to the architecture committee which does not meet officially anytime.

How about gathering up empty pill bottles and sending them oversees?  If the organization is moribund — those worthy  projects just don’t get off the ground.

What to do?  Don’t give up! Find a way!

written by Cameron Jackson   DrCameronJackson@gmail.com

 

 

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