Homeless in Santa Cruz CA – why?

Slipped on a banana peel  why homeless in Santa Cruz CA says  Jon Showalter, President of AFC & member of St. John’s Episcopal in Aptos, CA

Homeless in Santa Cruz CA — Why?  Largely just economic,   a slip on a banana peel?  Or are people homeless due to  lots of inter-related issues with use of  illegal drugs interwoven?  Your experience?

From government statistics:   Roughly 40% surveyed report at least one or more  serious health conditions:   drugs/alcohol;  psychotic/emotional;  post traumatic stress disorder,  physically disabled and  chronic health conditions. Such are the statistics.

It’s one thing to report and another thing as to what the real problems are.   Surveys are simply what people choose to report.

Per government  survey, roughly the same percentage  of homeless persons  look for work (43%)  compared with those who report they are  unable to work (43%).  These figures are from Santa Cruz County data.

A different   viewpoint  expressed recently  by   homeless advocate Jon  Showalter:  He  said in a talk  that 60% of local homeless  are “economic refugees” who “slipped on a banana peel” and  lost their social network. We need to know them human to human  Showalter emphasized.

It’s 60% economic  to 40%  other  (mental illness/ drug and alcohol)   states  homeless advocate Jon Showalter who spoke to 50+ women in Aptos,CA at Resurrection Catholic Community  3/18/19.

Showwalter is President of the Board for the Association of Faith Communities (AFC) and member of St. John’s Episcopal church   in Aptos, CA. The AFC meets monthly at Calvary Episcopal church  in Santa Cruz, CA   and  has 11 representatives of largely north Santa Cruz  faith organizations including Buddhist, Hindu and Christian.

Following Showalter’s presentation,  Pat Lorenzo of Resurrection Catholic Community  updated  attendees concerning other  programs currently in place through mid-county churches  which assist homeless persons  with meals, shelter, showers, socks  and other services.  The collect Socks program will continue says  Pat Lorenzo who applied for ,and received, three or four thousand  pairs of socks in December, 2018. Those socks have been dispersed throughout Santa Cruz County Lorenzo said.

New long term sheltering program:  Showalter states that a new sheltering program starts 3/18/19 at St. John’s Episcopal in Aptos, CA. Occupants of 3 cars will shelter long term in the parking lot of the church.  One car/person has been doing so for several months.  Persons  in the new sheltering  program will be  vetted through the Association of Faith Communities states Showalter.

Not in my backyard issues:

Whether or   how the nearby   housing project  — located adjacent on two sides  to St. John’s Episcopal   church in Aptos, CA  —  was contacted  concerning the long term sheltering program  was not discussed by Showalter  at the Guild meeting nor in  recent  email sent by the Rector, Mtr Tracy,   to St. John’s Episcopal  congregation.   At the Guild meeting an attendee discussed how  a successful   Catholic church sheltering program — located next to a school — managed the “not in my backyard issues”. Ongoing communication,  sharing  meals with  the parish  and a 6 am leave the premises each day  were central rules  she said.

Comment by Aptos Psychologist:

Are people homeless in Santa Cruz mainly   due to  “a slip on a banana peel”?  Mostly an economic issue and only somewhat a mental health/ drug issue?    Nope.  Why the multitude of  needles on the beaches? Why the feces and urine smells in downtown Santa Cruz?  Why the encampment of 100+  unauthorized tents at the entrance to Santa Cruz, CA.   Why do young mothers not take small children to Santa Cruz parks?

Reality:   It’s probably the reverse — 80+ percent drug/ alcohol/ mental illness and  20 percent economic.

What do statistics say?

Take Away :  The numbers show an overall decrease in homeless persons comparing  numbers   first collected (2005)  to the  latest numbers (2017).   There were about 3,400 homeless  in 2005 — and 12 years later — about   2,200 in 2017.

For communities to receive federal grant money for homeless issues those communities must count homeless persons every two years.   Communities   use  the Point in Time method of counting.

Statistics  collected by Applied Survey Research show that in 2005 there were 3,371 homeless and 8 years later in 2013  — the high point —  there were 3,536.  In 2015 the number was 1,964 and in 2017  it was 2,249.The statistics listed above  can be found via  United Way and from Santa Cruz County.

One size shoe  does not fit all:

There’s a fairly  new federal law that cities cannot displace homeless unless they provide a bed/ place for them.  New York City shelters almost all of their homeless.   California provides services to 1/3 of all the homeless in the U.S.   — must be the weather and beaches? — and roughly 70% of the homeless  are not sheltered.  Thus we see encampments of homeless tents at the entrance to Santa Cruz, CA.

What say you?  The government — and religious faith organizations  — should provide long term  house / housing space for all?

written by Cameron Jackson

Monerey Bay Forum

127 Jewell Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
United States (US)
Phone: 831 688 6002
Fax: 831 688 7717
Email: jaj48@aol.com

Give people “free fish” or a fishing pole? Free fish first! per COPA / Central Coast Interfaith Sponsors Inc speaking at St. John’s in Aptos CA

Give people in need a “free fish” or fishing pole?

Give people in need a  “free fish” or a fishing pole?  Free fish first! per  COPA / Central Coast Interfaith Sponsors Inc.

Community organizer Tim McManus of COPA / Central Coast Interfaith Sponsors Inc.,  a non-profit organization  located in Watsonville, CA,    spoke 9/16/2018  to 15- 20 parishioners  at  St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church in Aptos, Calif.

So, does your church/ synagogue / mosque “welcome the stranger”? Seek “social justice”?

How about lots of  cheap  housing,   free health care/ free  specialist MD referrals for  illegal alien  immigrants, & expanded  free mental health?  Those are COPA’s 2018  goals for Santa Cruz, Monterey and San Benito Counties in California.

So what  methods really  work to effect “social justice” according to COPA?

Just show up  when told to  —  says   McManus of COPA /  Central Coast Interfaith Sponsors Inc.  The power politics of sheer body count  with government officials effects COPA specified change  according to  Mr.  McManus.

Here’s what COPA Tim McManus says:

 

________

Aptos Psychologist:  COPA is not my cup of tea.  What was the original tea party that lead to the American revolution all about?  Not about “body count” muscling local government officials to achieve socialist progressive goals. About COPA — be wary. Give a fishing pole not free fish.

 

Save water! Use a drip system — here’s how to program the Hunter PRO C for your drip watering system

A drip watering system saves water —  

Save water!   Use a drip system.  Here’s how!   Learn to  program  the Hunter PRO C  and use it for your drip watering system.  Make every drip of water count!

A rainbow in Aptos Community Garden, taken in Aptos, CA in March 2018

Where does a  rainbow start and end?  This rainbow    hovers over  Aptos Communtiy Garden!

The rainbow  was  taken by one of our Gardeners JoAnn,    in March, 2018.   Wow!

Some Aptos Community Garden plots are available!  Call 831 688-5727 x 2.

Since 2010, the Garden,  located at the end of Soquel Avenue  in Aptos, CA,   offers small plots for people to grow organic  with the opportunity to meet other Gardeners.

You can see the white steeple of Christ Lutheran Church in Aptos, CA in the background.

Lots of things going on at Christ Lutheran.  Services are at 10 AM on Sunday.

written by Cameron Jackson

which RAIL TRAIL best for people living in Santa Cruz County? Still time to tell the RTC what you think!

Which RAIL TRAIL best for people who live in  Santa Cruz County?

Do we want a wide TRAIL  that can handle electric bikes and wheel chairs and walkers or do we want  a narrow trail  along a high fence that preserves the rail tracks for a train that may never happen?

There’s still time for you to tell the Regional Transportation Center what you think.

Measure D — which passed in 2017  — preserves the current  rail tracks and permits only a narrow trail.

Maybe there’s a better solution?  Read and decide.

Click  here   for a comparison of the wide one versus narrow one.

Go to the link below to sign petition.

https://www.change.org/p/santa-cruz-county-rtc-help-build-a-world-class-greenway-in-santa-cruz-county-by-removing-the-train-tracks

Thank you Dana Abbott, a gardener with Aptos Community Garden, for providing information.

written by  Cameron Jackson   drcameronjackson@gmail.com

Sanctuary Cities Santa Cruz & Watsonville: Why not follow federal laws which permit ICE to arrest at Local Jails rather than go find them at home, work & in community?

   Sanctuary Cities Santa Cruz & Watsonville:  Why not follow federal laws on the books which permit federal authorities aka  ICE to arrest “bad dudes” in local jails rather than go find them in their homes, work place and community?  Santa Cruz has some of the highest rates of crime in California.

Let’s do what we can to reduce crime in Santa Cruz and Watsonville, California. Below is a link to a FOX news report on ICE activities.

 

https://www.liveleak.com/view?i=43a_1519325971

National Statistics on Recidivism — who gets arrested again and again

Bureau of Justice Statistics studies have found high rates of recidivism among released prisoners. One study tracked 404,638 prisoners in 30 states after their release from prison in 2005.[1] The researchers found that:

  • Within three years of release, about two-thirds (67.8 percent) of released prisoners were rearrested.
  • Within five years of release, about three-quarters (76.6 percent) of released prisoners were rearrested.
  • Of those prisoners who were rearrested, more than half (56.7 percent) were arrested by the end of the first year.

  • Property offenders were the most likely to be rearrested, with 82.1 percent of released property offenders arrested for a new crime compared with 76.9 percent of drug offenders, 73.6 percent of public order offenders and 71.3 percent of violent offenders.

It’s time that local Santa Cruz county  politicians set policies that save fragile resources.

Per the FOX interview (see above link), the top ICE official says that ICE can process 10 inmates in  in one 8 hour  shift.  Vastly more time and resources are required for ICE  to find the”bad dudes” who were released back on the streets.

Connect with data bases so it’s easier to capture the truly “bad dudes” committing horrific crimes across the USA.

Currently ICE has access to local law enforcement databases, organized by states, such as Arizona and Texas, and metropolitan regions, such as the greater Seattle, Los Angeles, and Washington D.C. areas. In Arizona, AZLink, the database that experienced the most DHS searches during this period, pools together information from numerous law enforcement agencies across the state.

The person-power required  for ICE  find the “bad dudes” released back into the community  is huge.

ICE targets individuals known to be at certain places in Santa Cruz and Watsonville, CA.    By putting the work on ICE  go find them in the community  generates fears concerning  who else will be picked up.

Releasing “bad dudes” back on the streets puts Santa Cruz county at risk of more crime.

The known rate for re-offending is over  high. Over 50% will be arrested again within one year.  So — by releasing the “bad guys” back on the streets local Santa Cruz and Watsonville Sanctuary City policies are directly responsible for more crime in Santa Cruz, Watsonville and elsewhere in the county.

Aptos Psychologist: 

Let’s hold our local Santa Cruz and Watsonville CA  politicians accountable.  Cooperate with ICE so that  the”bad dudes” — the really “bad dudes” — are put on ice and if appropriate deported. Let’s stop the revolving doors  at our local Santa Cruz and Watsonville  jails wherein those arrested are quickly put back on the streets.  What say you?

written  2/22/18  by Cameron Jackson  drcameronjackson@gmail.com

who receives the Body & Blood? Who can vote? Aptos CA Catholics & Episcopalians tighten their rules — very differently

rules tighten differently  at Episcopalian & Catholic churches in Aptos, CA

Aptos CA Catholics and Episcopalians tighten  their rules — in quite different ways.

  Episcopalians pay to pray before voting:

The laying on of hands by an Episcopalian bishop  and the payment of identifiable  money to the church are two of a number of   requirements for members  at St. John’s in Aptos, CA who want to vote Dec. 10, 2017.

  The Rector, Mother Tracy, writes in an email 12/07/2017  that  in order to be “technically” an Episcopalian,   sometime in the past an Episcopalian bishop laid hands in a church service  on the person.   All  who meet various  requirements can vote Dec. 10 for elections to the church board.

Aptos Catholic  christians also tighten their rules:  The last to receive will be first now. Different housekeeping rules will  be  enforced at  Resurrection Catholic Community. The order of who gets served  first is one change.

  Remember  the bible verse,    “The  last will be first —  and the first will be last”? [Matthew 20:16] It’s an apt summary.

   The Eucharistic Ministers at  Resurrection Catholic Community   who assist with the service  — these people  who used to be the  last persons  to receive — will now be first persons   to receive.   Each Eucharistic Minister will  receive from the  Catholic priest prior to   serving others.

It was stated that this is an “old”  Catholic rule  — one of many “shoulds” that need to  be done — that  now  goes into effect at Resurrection Catholic Community in Aptos, CA.    Further,   the tender  care with which any remaining Body and Blood is handled after everyone has received, those rules are tightened.

 So — are there any  Aptos Catholic christians who want to receive directly from their priest?   Ask to serve and be trained  as an Eucharistic Minister. The last to receive will now be first to receive at Resurrection Catholic Community in Aptos.

 At St. John’s episcopal church all attendees standing in a circle  receive the Body from the priest and then they receive the  Blood from an assisting Eucharistic Minister.

Of most importance is participation as the Body of Christ.  All are welcome at St. John’s episcopal and Resurrection catholic community.

Below are photos taken 12/10 on Voting Day at St. John’s episcopal. Great coffee! 

written by Cameron Jackson

Monerey Bay Forum

127 Jewell Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
United States (US)
Phone: 831 688 6002
Fax: 831 688 7717
Email: jaj48@aol.com