Recall Santa Cruz City Councilmen Glover & Krohn? Remember Ross Encampment?

 

Recall  Santa Cruz City Councilmen  Glover & Krohn?  Remember the Ross encampment?    Remember the sight of hundreds of tents for many weeks located  at the  entrance to Santa Cruz?

Later, after they had to leave, remember the thousands of needles and tons of garbage that were  cleaned up?

Remember what thousands of drivers  saw week after week when  passing  by the  intersection of Highway #1 and Highway #9.

Remember.   Then consider  signing  the petition to remove both Krohn and Glover  from the Santa Cruz City Council.

For move information go to Santa Cruz United’s Research  list of articles and videos.

written by Cameron Jackson   jaj48@aol.com

 

Public Safety better or worse 2019 in Santa Cruz & Watsonville CA ?

Is public safety better or worse in Santa Cruz County in 2019?  The Democrats control awnings and signs  — but what about violent crime, needles and other health issues?

Is public safety better or worse  2019  in Santa Cruz County?

What’s the fall out from years and years of  Democrat Party policies on  Santa Cruz and Watsonville, CA?

Some current 2019  impressions:

  • Kids kill  other  kids in Watsonville, CA.   Take a look at crime statistics.   Because Watsonville gang members routinely  target younger  kids,  parents keep children  inside their homes. Kids are not allowed to ‘hang  out’ in  their front yards in Watsonville, CA. So parents tell me.
  • North County Santa Cruz CA  frequently  ignores South County Watsonville CA   issues.  Watsonville and Santa Cruz  are two  different worlds   joined by Highway 1.
  • Over 600 kids require  sheltering  on any given day  throughout Santa Cruz County. So says an employee of the Salvation Army shelter in Watsonville.
  • Psychotic adults hang  out  and talk in loud voices to themselves   at the  McDonalds Restaurant    on  Ocean  Street in Santa Cruz.  The Watsonvile McDonalds are much more family centered and much cleaner.
  • Two ‘more than typical’ Progressives city officials  face probable  recall by  8000+ Santa Cruz City voters.  The recall effort states that these two public officials  ignored  numerous   public safety issues  (needles,  human feces and violence) posed by the Ross St encampment.  And other issues.  Click the recall effort link for more information.
  • Mothers & the general  public  routinely watch   for needles and drug related debris  on  l Santa Cruz County  beaches.
  • ‘Free’  Santa Cruz beaches are  far dirtier than the CA County managed beaches which  you pay to enter.
  • Idle adults hang out in droves   near  the Santa Cruz  COSCO, close to the Ribele Family Shelter Building located  at Highway 1 and River St.  It does not ‘feel safe’ to drive near by.
  • Oh, my …… Oh my ….
  • There’s more control by city  government   of  ‘the little things’ — such as can a business have a sign  or an awning?  — than the ‘big picture’ i.e,  how can we work with the community to   reduce    violent crime and improve public safety?  
  • Opps!!!     Perhaps it’s time for a change from the Democrats and their   policies?

write to  Cameron Jackson   JAJ4848@aol.com

Trump’s tariffs on Mexico will reduce illegal immigration?

 

illegal immigrants cross into USA

Trump’s tariffs on Mexico will reduce illegal immigration?  Doubtful.

The economy is booming.   Jobs are easy to get. People seek freedom.

All a person has to do is get in the USA and disappear for two years before showing up for a hearing. Thousands are picked up daily by the border patrol and  sent throughout the U.S.A.   See picture above.  About 1,000 were arrested May 20, 2019.

Suggestive that those illegals do get jobs, a record amount of money is sent back to central america this year.

Trump is ‘making good’ on a promise to his core supporters prior to his election.  Trump has tried other routes — with little support from the courts or congress.   So, ‘hit them where it hurts’ i.e., in Mexico’s pocket book. Tariffs  on Mexico will start at 5% and escalate.

avocados from Mexico may  soon cost more

Looks like avocados from Mexico  will cost more.

Immigration and health care costs are likely big issues in the 2020 elections.  The now Democrat controlled  congress spends little energy on either issue and prefers Trump bashing.  And now Trump bashes back.

 

Homeless in Santa Cruz CA – why?

Slipped on a banana peel  why homeless in Santa Cruz CA says  Jon Showalter, President of AFC & member of St. John’s Episcopal in Aptos, CA

Homeless in Santa Cruz CA — Why?  Largely just economic,   a slip on a banana peel?  Or are people homeless due to  lots of inter-related issues with use of  illegal drugs interwoven?  Your experience?

From government statistics:   Roughly 40% surveyed report at least one or more  serious health conditions:   drugs/alcohol;  psychotic/emotional;  post traumatic stress disorder,  physically disabled and  chronic health conditions. Such are the statistics.

It’s one thing to report and another thing as to what the real problems are.   Surveys are simply what people choose to report.

Per government  survey, roughly the same percentage  of homeless persons  look for work (43%)  compared with those who report they are  unable to work (43%).  These figures are from Santa Cruz County data.

A different   viewpoint  expressed recently  by   homeless advocate Jon  Showalter:  He  said in a talk  that 60% of local homeless  are “economic refugees” who “slipped on a banana peel” and  lost their social network. We need to know them human to human  Showalter emphasized.

It’s 60% economic  to 40%  other  (mental illness/ drug and alcohol)   states  homeless advocate Jon Showalter who spoke to 50+ women in Aptos,CA at Resurrection Catholic Community  3/18/19.

Showwalter is President of the Board for the Association of Faith Communities (AFC) and member of St. John’s Episcopal church   in Aptos, CA. The AFC meets monthly at Calvary Episcopal church  in Santa Cruz, CA   and  has 11 representatives of largely north Santa Cruz  faith organizations including Buddhist, Hindu and Christian.

Following Showalter’s presentation,  Pat Lorenzo of Resurrection Catholic Community  updated  attendees concerning other  programs currently in place through mid-county churches  which assist homeless persons  with meals, shelter, showers, socks  and other services.  The collect Socks program will continue says  Pat Lorenzo who applied for ,and received, three or four thousand  pairs of socks in December, 2018. Those socks have been dispersed throughout Santa Cruz County Lorenzo said.

New long term sheltering program:  Showalter states that a new sheltering program starts 3/18/19 at St. John’s Episcopal in Aptos, CA. Occupants of 3 cars will shelter long term in the parking lot of the church.  One car/person has been doing so for several months.  Persons  in the new sheltering  program will be  vetted through the Association of Faith Communities states Showalter.

Not in my backyard issues:

Whether or   how the nearby   housing project  — located adjacent on two sides  to St. John’s Episcopal   church in Aptos, CA  —  was contacted  concerning the long term sheltering program  was not discussed by Showalter  at the Guild meeting nor in  recent  email sent by the Rector, Mtr Tracy,   to St. John’s Episcopal  congregation.   At the Guild meeting an attendee discussed how  a successful   Catholic church sheltering program — located next to a school — managed the “not in my backyard issues”. Ongoing communication,  sharing  meals with  the parish  and a 6 am leave the premises each day  were central rules  she said.

Comment by Aptos Psychologist:

Are people homeless in Santa Cruz mainly   due to  “a slip on a banana peel”?  Mostly an economic issue and only somewhat a mental health/ drug issue?    Nope.  Why the multitude of  needles on the beaches? Why the feces and urine smells in downtown Santa Cruz?  Why the encampment of 100+  unauthorized tents at the entrance to Santa Cruz, CA.   Why do young mothers not take small children to Santa Cruz parks?

Reality:   It’s probably the reverse — 80+ percent drug/ alcohol/ mental illness and  20 percent economic.

What do statistics say?

Take Away :  The numbers show an overall decrease in homeless persons comparing  numbers   first collected (2005)  to the  latest numbers (2017).   There were about 3,400 homeless  in 2005 — and 12 years later — about   2,200 in 2017.

For communities to receive federal grant money for homeless issues those communities must count homeless persons every two years.   Communities   use  the Point in Time method of counting.

Statistics  collected by Applied Survey Research show that in 2005 there were 3,371 homeless and 8 years later in 2013  — the high point —  there were 3,536.  In 2015 the number was 1,964 and in 2017  it was 2,249.The statistics listed above  can be found via  United Way and from Santa Cruz County.

One size shoe  does not fit all:

There’s a fairly  new federal law that cities cannot displace homeless unless they provide a bed/ place for them.  New York City shelters almost all of their homeless.   California provides services to 1/3 of all the homeless in the U.S.   — must be the weather and beaches? — and roughly 70% of the homeless  are not sheltered.  Thus we see encampments of homeless tents at the entrance to Santa Cruz, CA.

What say you?  The government — and religious faith organizations  — should provide long term  house / housing space for all?

written by Cameron Jackson

Monerey Bay Forum

127 Jewell Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
United States (US)
Phone: 831 688 6002
Fax: 831 688 7717
Email: jaj48@aol.com

Not in my backyard says NY aristocrats

 

New York residents furious about homeless shelter in Manhattan neighborhood

Not in my backyard:   Wealthy New Yorkers are furious that Mayor Bill de Blasio plans to open a homeless shelter in their ritzy Manhattan neighborhood.

Homeless moved:   Dozens of wealthy residents packed into a community meeting to voice their anger over the decision to move 150 homeless men into the former Park Savoy Hotel, NY1 reports. The residents are concerned that the move will increase crime and decrease property values in their neighborhood on “billionaires row.”

“How are these poor people, whose only livelihood is in one bag, deal with a $6 coffee and a $15,000 dress on the windows of Fifth Avenue?” asked one resident, a middle-aged man with a foreign accent. “Aren’t we breeding crime by doing this?” he asked, earning applause from the audience.

Yeah, well, maybe you should have thought of that in the voting booth when you re-elected de Blasio, buddy. More liberal angst:

NY residents mobilize:   Some residents have formed a group, the West 58th Street Coalition, to oppose the homeless shelter in their neighborhood, CBS2 reports. CBS2 identified the coalition’s leader as Suzanne Silverstein, a fashion executive who is the president of upscale women’s fashion line Parker NY, according to her Linkedin profile. “This is a tourist area. Can you imagine you are like next door, you have the best hotels in New York City, you destroy that in order to help 150 people,” said restaurant owner Maria Loi, according to CBS2. The New York Times has described Loi as a “celebrity chef.”

———————————————————–

Firenze Sage:   What is sauce for us gooses is sauce for them ganders.

 

Undocumented? Illegal? Go to East Palo Alto for full support services from the school district

Where to go if you are undocumented,  ‘homeless’ or need to ‘double up’ to keep housing costs down?

Go to East Palo Alto — just three miles from Stanford University.   The East Palo Alto  school district provides it all for ‘homeless’ students and their families: 3 meals a day, groceries, showers and overnight parking in a church lot.

East Palo Alto even  provides  an Uber or taxi if you need a ride to school.  

Families doubling up to keep housing costs down has long been a way of life in California.  Now, with the possibility of ICE enforcement more ‘homeless’ youth and their families  are ‘doubling up’ these days in the Bay Area.

East Palo Alto has the largest number of ‘homeless’ youth who are English language learners.

the above is written by Cameron Jackson.   Below is the complete story available in the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

The Santa Cruz Sentinel printed only part of its story in the print edition today, October 9, 2017.  Below is the complete story available online.

 

“The San Francisco Bay Area, with its Teslas, tech start-ups and $3,700 one-bedroom rents, is one of the most affluent regions in the country but also home to nearly 15,000 homeless children.

“Most of the students are in the urban areas, but they also live in the wealthy enclaves. They’re in Menlo Park, they’re in the San Ramon Valley, they’re even in Ross in Marin County, where the median household income tops $200,000. And they’re most certainly undercounted: parents report to schools whether their family is homeless, and they have plenty of reasons not to admit to it: fear of deportation, fear of the government taking their children away, and shame.

“According to the Department of Education, “homeless” means living in a car, motel, campsite, shelter, on the street or doubled up with other families due to financial hardship. In the Bay Area, most of those children are doubled up with other families, although in San Francisco hundreds are living on the street or in shelters.

The Bay Area has 420 school districts, charter schools and county offices of education in its nine counties, spread over 6,900 square miles from Cloverdale to Gilroy. But almost none have a higher percentage of homeless children than the Ravenswood City Elementary School District in East Palo Alto.

The Ravenswood district is less than 3 miles from Stanford University, yet has one of the highest percentages of homeless students in the state. More than 37 percent of the district’s 3,076 students are homeless, and of those, 96 percent live “doubled up” with other families, sharing a home or apartment or even a garage.

Nearly 88 percent of Ravenswood students qualify for free and reduced-price lunch, and 64 percent are English learners.

The district receives some federal grant money to help these children, but “that’s just a drop in the bucket. A Band-aid,” said Superintendent Gloria Hernandez-Goff. “Paying for these services ends up being a huge encroachment into the general fund. But we do it because kids can’t learn if they’re hungry, if they’re tired, if they’re distracted or worried. Our schools need to be a safe place where families know their children are cared for.”

The district also gets extra funding under the state’s Local Control Funding Formula, which steers money to schools to serve high-needs students, including those who are homeless, low-income, English learners or in foster care.

East Palo Alto provides the following services:   Ravenswood provides three meals a day, plus snacks, to all students regardless of whether they’re homeless and arranges for a food bank to give regular, two-week supplies of groceries to parents. The district also provides free uniforms for students, washers and dryers on school campuses, full-time counselors at every school, and arranges for families to get free showers at the local YMCA. A nearby Catholic church allows families to sleep overnight in the parking lot.

Transportation costs:   Perhaps the biggest expense, Hernandez-Goff said, is transportation. Children who bounce between homeless shelters are legally entitled to free transportation to school, so the district will send buses, taxis or even Uber to deliver the children to school every day. Homeless families tend to move frequently, and sometimes find themselves at shelters 20 miles away. By law, homeless children can continue attending the same school without having to transfer to a new school every time their family moves.

“It’s expensive, but we patch things together,” she said. “The bottom line is, the thing that has always unified this country is public education. Schools have always stepped up to address the needs of students. It’s not just about books — it’s so much more.”

In Ravenswood, most of the homeless families are Latin American immigrants living with other immigrant families. But in San Francisco, state data show, roughly half of the city’s 1,984 homeless students live on their own: teenage runaways escaping abusive homes or violence elsewhere.

No one knows exactly where these students live in San Francisco, but 300 a night sleep at the Larkin Street Youth Services shelter. Hundreds of others sleep in parks or under freeways, on friends’ couches, or trade sex for a place to sleep, according to Larkin Street’s executive director, Sherilyn Adams.

Amazingly, some find a way to get to school every day.

“A lot of these kids are not visibly homeless, and they often don’t want you to know they’re homeless,” Adams said. “Adolescence is a time of blending in, not standing out. So these kids face a lot of shame, a lot of isolation. Trying to do school work while figuring out where they’re going to sleep every night — they have a lot on their plate.”

In addition to the shelter, Larkin Street provides medical and behavioral services, street outreach and a drop-in center. Another nonprofit, Hamilton Families, contracts with San Francisco Unified to provide after-school tutoring and activities, field trips, bus passes, uniforms and other services to more than 800 children annually in the city.

In the East Bay, Oakland Unified saw its number of homeless students shoot up from 400 in 2014-15 to 635 in 2015-16 to 901 in 2016-17, largely due to the escalating cost of housing, the district’s homeless coordinator, Trish Anderson, said.

“Those numbers are real,” she said. “Rents are too high, and people are losing their homes.”

Oakland Unified provides a one-stop shop of services for its homeless families, including food, referrals to shelters and help enrolling in Medi-Cal. The district also provides immediate enrollment to homeless students, allowing them to waive much of the paperwork, and bus service to school. Like San Francisco, Oakland has a significant number of homeless youth who aren’t living with their families. Some find emergency shelter at DreamCatcher, an eight-bed shelter that provides a range of services for students as long as they remain in school.

Just north of San Francisco, San Rafael City Schools in Marin County goes to great lengths to identify homeless children and train teachers to accommodate them. In 2016-17, the district reported 625 homeless children at its eight elementary schools, one of the highest rates in the state.

As is the case throughout California, lack of affordable housing is the primary cause for the high homeless rate in the area. Immigrant parents working in the restaurant, housekeeping or landscaping sectors cannot afford to rent an apartment, so they share space with other families. Median monthly rent for a two-bedroom apartment in San Rafael is $3,080, almost three times the national average.

“We definitely have affordable housing issues. Unfortunately, that’s not something officials are moving very quickly on,” said Julia Neff, accountability coordinator for San Rafael City Schools. “But it’s the school district’s responsibility to meet these students where they are. We do what we can.”

______

   The Sentinel frames their  story as one about ‘homelessness’.  It’s really a story about undocumented youth and their families.  And it’s really   a story about how CA is addressing the sanctuary city issues.  And it’s a story about borders and whether  America should  have borders. Remember that young woman killed by an illegal who had been deported 5 times from the USA.  That’s when there was a huge surge in support for control of our borders.

written by Cameron Jackson 10/9/2017     DrCameronJackson@gmail.com