A cup of water costs how much in Aptos, CA? At Sno-White?

paper cup costs 7 cents

How much does a cup of  water cost in Aptos, CA?   About  75 cents for the cup.

Sno-White Drive In  now   charges about $.75 for a paper cup that costs .07 cents.   Sno-White  charges about 10 times what the cup costs. This is a new charge.

Someone recently bought a breakfast sandwich  ($3.50) and also  asked for a half cup of  water.

The customer gave Sno-White   a $5.oo bill and was given back a quarter, a nickel and a few pennies.  As  the breakfast sandwich costs $3.50 the additional charge for the paper cup was about $.75.

Asked ‘why charge for water?’ the reply  from the cook/ owner  was ‘I charge for the cup’.

So, what do paper cups cost?  About 7 cents.

You can buy 1,000  hot/cold paper cups (12 oz) on Amazon for $69.85 with no charge for shipping.  

Sno-White Drive In in Aptos, CA  has good  ‘burgers.  It’s located near  the entrance to  Seacliff State Beach.   

Charging 10 times the cost for a paper cup is not good public relations.  When  a customer wants a cup of water — let them have it for free.  That’s good PR.  

The City of Watsonville  just recently  now requires all  restaurants which provide paper cups to charge 10 cents.   They do so based on the state wide law regarding paper bags.

Per The Santa Cruz Sentinel 7/12/2019 Santa Cruz County eyes sweeping plastic prohibitions.  Also under consideration is a fee for disposable cups — similiar to the statewide 10 cent fee for grocery bags — and a requirement that all businesses provide recycling bins for their customers.

Aptos Psychologist:  Pe adage,  ‘Waste not, want not.’

Best to keep handy  a re-usable bag for groceries  and a re-usable cup for water.

Sno-White Drive In has good, reasonably  priced  ‘burgers.  Keep a water bottle in your car.

written by Cameron Jackson   jaj48@aolcom

 

What’s it matter whether USA citizen or resident in 2020? A lot!

Does  it matter  whether your’re a citizen or resident of USA in 2020?  Yes, it   matters mightily.

You should care about the question of citizenship on the upcoming 2020 Census.  We need an honest count of residents compared to citizens.   If we don’t ask — we don’t know.

Organizations and state governments which encourage more population, e.g., California by its generous welfare system and  Sanctuary Cities ,   care mightily.  CA wants a larger population precisely because more population means more power in Congress.   That’s because of how our the 435 congressional representatives are divided among the USA states.

Seats in the House of Representatives are apportioned among the states by total population.

Since ‘residents’ are counted as part of the total  population that means that illegal aliens who are present  at the time of the census are counted in the apportionment process.

Here’s a hypothetical:   Imagine that suddenly — overnight —  the populations of California (39 million) and Texas (29 million) doubled  due to an influx of millions  of illegals coming over the southern border into Texas and California.  Were  that unlikely hypothetical to occur,  both CA and Texas would increase the number of representatives for each state.  The total number of representatives is set at 435.  Some states would lose representatives and some states — such as CA and Texas — would gain representatives. More representative equates to more political power.

What is a citizen?  In 1787, the Constitution defined citizenship as open to “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof.”

What’s a population census?  population census is the total process of collecting, compiling, evaluating, analysing and publishing or otherwise disseminating demographic, economic and social data pertaining, at a specified time, to all persons in a country or in a well delimited part of a country.Sep 25, 20.

Clearly — it matters mightily how many ‘illegal aliens’ are currently in the USA as of 2020.  For years politicians fume about the”millions in the shadows’.  Well, let’s count them.

And then  let’s require  that our congressional representatives  forge immigration policies in 2020  that make sense to We the People.

It’s time to change the Flores Agreement which limits the number of days children can be held from 21 to 100 days. The ‘catch and release’ policy implemented  by President Obama must cease.

Yes it mightily matters how many citizens are in the USA as of 2020. It’s all about freedom.  

Trump says 7/11/19 that he won’t back down, that he will use existing government information to determine how many citizens there are in the USA.

written by Cameron Jackson    jaj48@aol.com

 

CA gives illegals free medical insurance for first time anywhere & imposes a water tax to truck in water

 

free medical insurance fol illegals

Democrat controlled California just agreed to give some illegals free medical insurance. This is a first anywhere in the  USA. Read what Dan Walters writes 6/15/2019 in the Santa Cruz Sentinel in California.

Democrats re-impose the Individual Mandate — which the courts found illegal — and call it a ‘fee’.

Remember Obama’s Individual Mandate?    The Robert’s court decided  ObamaCare  was legal because the Individual Mandate was a ‘tax’ which the government could impose.  Later such a ‘tax’ has been found illegal.

So CA politicians take what has been said by the courts to be illegal  — i.e.,, the Individual Mandate — and call it a ‘fee’ and impose it on citizens to pay for illegals to have free medical care.

This is  how CA — with a multi-billion dollar surplus will pay for illegals to have medical insurance. Very twisted thinking.

There’s no  explanation  why this group of  illegals  (age 18-25 or so) should get free medical insurance.  These illegals are not older or disabled.

And to add further insult to injury (my view) the Democrats now charge for water.  CA now has a Water Tax.    Why?   There are some communities in CA  with bad water and hence  water is trucked in to them. The Newson Democrat socialist politicians  in Sacramento have now  imposed  a ‘carbon tax’ because it takes fossil fuels (gas)  to truck in that water. If that bothers them so much   how about using an electric car to truck in bottled water?   ‘

Re-impose  the illegal Individual Mandate to give illegals free health insurance.  Illegals should not get free health insurance as a prize for jumping in front of persons legally requesting to enter.    And imposing a Water Tax because it takes fossil fuels to truck the water to a few communities is ……

The Democrats believe they can do anything and get away with it here in CA.  It’s time for working folk to wake up and speak up and change one Party rule in CA.

When enough is enough — what;s there to do?   Petition the government.

written by Cameron Jackson     jaj48@aol.com

How to improve public meetings? Require officials state ahead how they plan to vote

Require elected officials state in writing — 24 hours ahead of time — how they plan to vote

The  way current  Council meetings are currently conducted is an abomination .

I suggest that each member of the council be required under penalty of forfeiture of  to submit 24 hours in advance of any meeting a statement in writing which sets forth the member’s  views on issues to be voted upon and contentious issues which are not to be voted upon.

The views are not binding but are for the purpose of alerting the assembled crowd to the position of the particular   council member which would allow a member of the audience to focus his question on the issue at hand. And, furthermore, it would require the councilmember to answer a specific question with respect to his view and why he holds it.

At present we have stone faces unresponsive to public input.

Require officials state how they plan to vote 24 hours ahead.

written by James Jackson    jaj48@a0l.com

Are CA politicians worth their pepper and SALT (very high State And Local Taxes)

So — are CA politicians worth their pepper and SALT  ( State And Local Taxes = SALT)

States such as California and New York have the highest state and local taxes in the U.S.A.

No longer can people living in high tax states — such as  California and New York — deduct their entire SALT taxes in their entirety from their federal tax bill.  They can only deduct a maximum of  10 K.

As the Bay Area has a handful of counties where homeowners pay high state and local taxes — this matters mightily whether high income homeowners keep paying those rates and  stay in CA.

Thus the underlying question — are CA politicians and their policies worth their SALT? Maybe it’s time to re-consider what CA taxpayers get for their money …..   written by Cameron Jackson 

Monerey Bay Forum

127 Jewell Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
United States (US)
Phone: 831 688 6002
Fax: 831 688 7717
Email: jaj48@aol.com

I.C.E. is nice? Santa Cruz & Watsonville CA say ‘NO” as they are Sanctuary Cities…

 

I.C.E. is nice?  Sanctuary Cities oppose  I.C.E &   include Watsonville, CA and Sana Cruz, CA

I.C.E. is nice?   Sanctuary Cities include Santa Cruz, CA and Watsonville, CA say ‘No” ….

In an March 15, 2017 article written by Joseph Geha for the East Bay Times, the chairman of the City of Fremont California’s Human Relations Commission, is quoted as saying: “There are strength in numbers. The more communities, the more cities that sign on to sanctuary city status, the more difficult it will be for the federal government government to do anything about it.”  [The Fremont city council passed its sanctuary resolution that day.]

     A ‘sanctuary flash mob’ strategy does appear to be the progressive Democrats’ plan to overwhelm President Trump’s efforts to rein in sanctuary jurisdictions by  threatening cuts in  federal funding.

     Since President Trump released his Executive Order, the trend has been a sharp increase in the number of sanctuary resolutions being passed across the country.  That trend slowed after US Attorney General Jeff Sessions began to also publicly warn that sanctuary jurisdictions’ might lose federal funds.

Some sanctuary cities then began to double down on their policies and file lawsuits claiming that the federal government can’t cut some or all the threatened funding.

     Ultimately, the sanctuary battle will continue in the federal court system and likely be decided by one or more separate U.S. Supreme Court decisions.

          Does your town, city, county, or state have a written or unwritten sanctuary policy?  First, read the disclaimer and then view The Original List of Sanctuary Cities, USA, below.

Note:  This article was first written in 2006 by Steve Salvi, Founder, Ohio Jobs & Justice PAC.  It was last revised: July 29, 2017. 

 

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/leahbarkoukis/2017/03/31/new-dhs-report-reveals-the-types-of-illegal-immigrants-sanctuary-cities-are-letting-go-hint-theyre-not-nonviolent-n2306Comment: Where is there more freedom on earth?   In Spanish speaking areas?  In north america:    San Salvador?  Mexico?  Venezuela?     Or is there more freedom where English law started?

Undocumented? Illegal? Go to East Palo Alto for full support services from the school district

Where to go if you are undocumented,  ‘homeless’ or need to ‘double up’ to keep housing costs down?

Go to East Palo Alto — just three miles from Stanford University.   The East Palo Alto  school district provides it all for ‘homeless’ students and their families: 3 meals a day, groceries, showers and overnight parking in a church lot.

East Palo Alto even  provides  an Uber or taxi if you need a ride to school.  

Families doubling up to keep housing costs down has long been a way of life in California.  Now, with the possibility of ICE enforcement more ‘homeless’ youth and their families  are ‘doubling up’ these days in the Bay Area.

East Palo Alto has the largest number of ‘homeless’ youth who are English language learners.

the above is written by Cameron Jackson.   Below is the complete story available in the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

The Santa Cruz Sentinel printed only part of its story in the print edition today, October 9, 2017.  Below is the complete story available online.

 

“The San Francisco Bay Area, with its Teslas, tech start-ups and $3,700 one-bedroom rents, is one of the most affluent regions in the country but also home to nearly 15,000 homeless children.

“Most of the students are in the urban areas, but they also live in the wealthy enclaves. They’re in Menlo Park, they’re in the San Ramon Valley, they’re even in Ross in Marin County, where the median household income tops $200,000. And they’re most certainly undercounted: parents report to schools whether their family is homeless, and they have plenty of reasons not to admit to it: fear of deportation, fear of the government taking their children away, and shame.

“According to the Department of Education, “homeless” means living in a car, motel, campsite, shelter, on the street or doubled up with other families due to financial hardship. In the Bay Area, most of those children are doubled up with other families, although in San Francisco hundreds are living on the street or in shelters.

The Bay Area has 420 school districts, charter schools and county offices of education in its nine counties, spread over 6,900 square miles from Cloverdale to Gilroy. But almost none have a higher percentage of homeless children than the Ravenswood City Elementary School District in East Palo Alto.

The Ravenswood district is less than 3 miles from Stanford University, yet has one of the highest percentages of homeless students in the state. More than 37 percent of the district’s 3,076 students are homeless, and of those, 96 percent live “doubled up” with other families, sharing a home or apartment or even a garage.

Nearly 88 percent of Ravenswood students qualify for free and reduced-price lunch, and 64 percent are English learners.

The district receives some federal grant money to help these children, but “that’s just a drop in the bucket. A Band-aid,” said Superintendent Gloria Hernandez-Goff. “Paying for these services ends up being a huge encroachment into the general fund. But we do it because kids can’t learn if they’re hungry, if they’re tired, if they’re distracted or worried. Our schools need to be a safe place where families know their children are cared for.”

The district also gets extra funding under the state’s Local Control Funding Formula, which steers money to schools to serve high-needs students, including those who are homeless, low-income, English learners or in foster care.

East Palo Alto provides the following services:   Ravenswood provides three meals a day, plus snacks, to all students regardless of whether they’re homeless and arranges for a food bank to give regular, two-week supplies of groceries to parents. The district also provides free uniforms for students, washers and dryers on school campuses, full-time counselors at every school, and arranges for families to get free showers at the local YMCA. A nearby Catholic church allows families to sleep overnight in the parking lot.

Transportation costs:   Perhaps the biggest expense, Hernandez-Goff said, is transportation. Children who bounce between homeless shelters are legally entitled to free transportation to school, so the district will send buses, taxis or even Uber to deliver the children to school every day. Homeless families tend to move frequently, and sometimes find themselves at shelters 20 miles away. By law, homeless children can continue attending the same school without having to transfer to a new school every time their family moves.

“It’s expensive, but we patch things together,” she said. “The bottom line is, the thing that has always unified this country is public education. Schools have always stepped up to address the needs of students. It’s not just about books — it’s so much more.”

In Ravenswood, most of the homeless families are Latin American immigrants living with other immigrant families. But in San Francisco, state data show, roughly half of the city’s 1,984 homeless students live on their own: teenage runaways escaping abusive homes or violence elsewhere.

No one knows exactly where these students live in San Francisco, but 300 a night sleep at the Larkin Street Youth Services shelter. Hundreds of others sleep in parks or under freeways, on friends’ couches, or trade sex for a place to sleep, according to Larkin Street’s executive director, Sherilyn Adams.

Amazingly, some find a way to get to school every day.

“A lot of these kids are not visibly homeless, and they often don’t want you to know they’re homeless,” Adams said. “Adolescence is a time of blending in, not standing out. So these kids face a lot of shame, a lot of isolation. Trying to do school work while figuring out where they’re going to sleep every night — they have a lot on their plate.”

In addition to the shelter, Larkin Street provides medical and behavioral services, street outreach and a drop-in center. Another nonprofit, Hamilton Families, contracts with San Francisco Unified to provide after-school tutoring and activities, field trips, bus passes, uniforms and other services to more than 800 children annually in the city.

In the East Bay, Oakland Unified saw its number of homeless students shoot up from 400 in 2014-15 to 635 in 2015-16 to 901 in 2016-17, largely due to the escalating cost of housing, the district’s homeless coordinator, Trish Anderson, said.

“Those numbers are real,” she said. “Rents are too high, and people are losing their homes.”

Oakland Unified provides a one-stop shop of services for its homeless families, including food, referrals to shelters and help enrolling in Medi-Cal. The district also provides immediate enrollment to homeless students, allowing them to waive much of the paperwork, and bus service to school. Like San Francisco, Oakland has a significant number of homeless youth who aren’t living with their families. Some find emergency shelter at DreamCatcher, an eight-bed shelter that provides a range of services for students as long as they remain in school.

Just north of San Francisco, San Rafael City Schools in Marin County goes to great lengths to identify homeless children and train teachers to accommodate them. In 2016-17, the district reported 625 homeless children at its eight elementary schools, one of the highest rates in the state.

As is the case throughout California, lack of affordable housing is the primary cause for the high homeless rate in the area. Immigrant parents working in the restaurant, housekeeping or landscaping sectors cannot afford to rent an apartment, so they share space with other families. Median monthly rent for a two-bedroom apartment in San Rafael is $3,080, almost three times the national average.

“We definitely have affordable housing issues. Unfortunately, that’s not something officials are moving very quickly on,” said Julia Neff, accountability coordinator for San Rafael City Schools. “But it’s the school district’s responsibility to meet these students where they are. We do what we can.”

______

   The Sentinel frames their  story as one about ‘homelessness’.  It’s really a story about undocumented youth and their families.  And it’s really   a story about how CA is addressing the sanctuary city issues.  And it’s a story about borders and whether  America should  have borders. Remember that young woman killed by an illegal who had been deported 5 times from the USA.  That’s when there was a huge surge in support for control of our borders.

written by Cameron Jackson 10/9/2017     DrCameronJackson@gmail.com

Gardeners & Plot Numbers for Aptos Community Garden, Aptos CA

Aptos Community Garden

AptosCommunityGarden.info on Twitter has some  pictures for the Garden.

Like to say ‘hello’?   Maybe share produce  with   fellow gardeners at Aptos Community Garden in Aptos, CA?

That’s easy!

To facilitate ‘saying hello’,  see below list.  You know your plot number, so just look for numbers around you in the garden  &  that way you can easily get acquainted with fellow gardeners.  Saying ‘hello’ is a nice part of gardening together.

 Each plot number and name of person renting the plot are listed below.

Names of persons &  plot numbers at Aptos Community Garden, July 3, 2017:   

Chuc Nowark                     3

Laurie Nowark                  3

Cameron Jackson             6

Samantha Olden               7

Samantha Olden              8

Alejandro Callejas            9

 

Grace Baillie                       11          

Jane Amaral                       12

Wandis Wilcox                   13

JoAnn Christiansen         14

Mardee McGraw               16

Elizabeth Renfro               18

Lisa Logsdon                       19

 

John Lovett                        20

Sandy Lovett                      20

Adriana Bartch                  21

John Bartch                        21

Norma Spiegel                  22

Jackie Nelson                     23

John Nelson                       23

Jackie Nelson                     25

John Nelson                       25

Neil Kennedy                     26

MaryJo Voorhees            27

Doreen Albertson            28

Neil Kennedy                     29

 

Dana Abbott                      31

Debby Samuels                 32

Janine Kittleson                33

John Lovett                        34

Sandy Lovett                      34

Roberta Ruiz                      35

Daryl Wise                           36

Sumer   Yarema                37

Tom Yarema                       37

Donna Kaelin                     39

 

Lindsay Rosalba                40

Joseph Stearns                 41

Joseph Stearns                  42

Lucas Willey                        43

Sally Willey                          43

Gina Mersman                  44

Gina Mersman                  45

John Wescoat                    46

John Wescoat                    48

Verginia Voinea                 49

 

Lisa Dupont                        50

Erin McNeally                    51

Michael Schalow              52

Julie Lolmaugh                  53

Karen Juarez                      54

Michelle Lloyd                   55

Sian St. Laurent 55

Nathaniel Ritchie              56

Juanita Contin                   58

Max Contin                         58

 

George Winslow              62

Terrie Winslow                62

Andela  Milligan               63

Kasey Milligan                   63

Gina Mersman                  71

Gina Mersman                  73

Aptos Community Garden  — as of June,  2017  — has some  plots available.  Plot No.  10,  12,  24,  46 and 57 are still available.  Come see if one of the available  plots interests you.

Jobs: Middle class flees CA because …

 

jobs: middle class flee CA
jobs: middle class flee CA

Jobs:  Middle class flees CA because …. housing costs  are excessively high.  That’s a big reason.

“Not only are Californians leaving the state in large numbers, but the people heading for the exits are disproportionately middle class working families — the demographic backbone of American society,” the American Interest recently noted.

The Golden State has been haunted in recent times by sharply mixed economic indicators. “While California has added 2.1 million jobs since 2010, employment in six industries is still below 2007 levels, before the Great Recession, according to the center’s analysis. Those sectors — including construction, finance and manufacturing — generally pay more than the service-type jobs that we’re adding in droves,” the Sacramento Bee noted late last year.

Economic growth concentrated in Silicon Valley has also not done much to relieve the income or jobs picture for middle-classers.

“In a recent survey of states where ‘the middle class is dying,’ based on earning trajectories for middle-income cohorts, Business Insider ranked California first, with shrinking middle-class earnings and the third-highest proportion of wealth concentrated in the top 20 percent of residents,” Kotkin observed.

Some good news:  CA has lots of great public schools per this survey.  Graduating from a good school helps prepare young  people for jobs.    http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/california

Another reason middle class flees CA:  people are either very rich or very poor.  The culture is changing dramatically.  

 

How increase your faith? Use it. Today. The “size” of faith does not matter. Blessings of the Animals at St. John’s in Aptos, CA

 

hot dogs
hot dogs 

How increase  your  faith?  Use it  today.

Use the faith you have — such as a small mustard seed. Size of your faith does not matter. Use it.

Tonight there was a Feast of Five service at a local church in Aptos, CA — St. John’s.

At this event:   Comfy foods for you?  Hot dogs? Other meats?    Those orange chips someone brought? Those chip that leave yellow  marks on your fingers and taste so good.

One month from now there will be another Feast of Five service.

Every day you can stop by for Pokemon Balls.  Coming soon:  more locations for Poke Stops.